Sunday, June 22

Are we Man City in disguise?

Just seen the new away kits in the Romford WHU shop. Not sure about this at all. It's not the right shade of blue for WHU and features no white or claret. And with that sash it looks like a Manchester City away kit from the 1980s. What's wrong with all white or blue shirts with claret hoops as an away kit?

9 comments:

Gary said...

Not a bad shirt though, a bit too simple looking but in a boring rather than classic way, sash should gone right up the shoulder for me.

Anonymous said...

They play much better football and have better looking fans.

Pete May said...

Yes, I agree the sash should go right over the shoulder Gary. it could have been worse but doesn't seem to be much to do with WHU colours. Still at least we haven't got luminous green or grey like some teams...

spyinthesky said...

Right the blue sash represents West Ham/Thames Ironworks original deep blue which has been the norm of late while the third strip is usually predominantly white representing our other common colour in the early days. So seems to me the 3 strips pretty much cover the range of colours the club have used in their history. That said if the third strip as a splash of gold that would be a first and I presume would reflect that colour' s use on the badge.

Pete May said...

THanks spyinthesky, I guess the navy blue does reflect the early days of the Ironworks up to 1899, though my main gripe was it's the wrong shade of light blue. I was hoping for something more like the shade on the blue arms of our classic shirts… though I know nothing about fashion as my wife will testify!

Anonymous said...

It's ok. Just a bit "safe" and a bit boring IMO. Certainly doesn't get the pulses racing!

Anonymous said...

Up man city and up the hammers 2 working class teams

chris nichols said...

The club, Thames Ironworks[7] were the first ever winners of the West Ham Charity Cup in 1895 contested by clubs in the locality, then won the London League in 1897. They turned professional in 1898 upon entering the Southern League Second Division, and were promoted to the First Division at the first attempt.[8] The following year they came second from bottom, but had established themselves as a fully fledged competitive team. They comfortably fended off the challenge of local rivals Fulham in a relegation play-off, 5–1 in late April 1900 and retained their First Division status.[8]

The team initially played in full dark blue kits, as inspired by Mr. Hills, who had been an Oxford University "Blue", but changed the following season by adopting the sky blue shirts and white shorts combination worn through 1897 to 1899. In 1899 they acquired their now-traditional home kit combination of claret shirts and sky blue sleeves in a wager involving Aston Villa players, who were League Champions at the time.[9][10]

i like the dark blue and the fact is navy was our first colour so i think its right to have it strongly featured in our kit along with sky blue in fact this is the most true to our roots so we are not city we are west ham united FC

Anonymous said...

Great club, great supporters, hope the move to Olympic stadium goes well and you can get the same level of owner we have. To the Joy family and all the boys who worked at John Joy welding, big John gone but never forgotten, CTID.